Connecticut Hotel Workers Instructed to Recognize Trafficking

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Human TraffickingLaw & Policy

A new law in Connecticut that can make considerable headway in stopping human traffickers is now reaching point where it can make a difference. Hospitality workers are beginning training so that they can detect and report suspected human trafficking.  When the law was passed last year, Connecticut became the first state to require the instructions.  Staff in over 500 hotels, motels, and lodges in the state are required to participate in the training before October 1.

According to Krishna Patel, the foundation’s general counsel, “The goal is to teach employees to be more aware of potential trafficking signs with the hope that employees will be in a position to report their observations. Our goal has always been to create an anti-trafficking model in Connecticut that would extend to the rest of the country.”

Marriott works with ECPAT-USA and anti-human trafficking group Polaris to train 6,000 company employees—managers and staff—in departments like safety, housekeeping, and the front desk.

The 2016 law also requires operators of hotels, motels, inns and other lodgings to keep records of all guest transactions and receipts for at least six months. And this month, Democratic Gov. Dannel P. Malloy signed legislation that toughens penalties for human trafficking to 10 to 25 years in prison. The current term is one to 20 years.

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